What Tesla does better than Apple

appletesla.png

While I was watching the pitch of Elon Musk for the new Model 3 by Tesla, I saw a similarity with the latest iPhone SE presentation. What I realized was that both companies seem to have a similar strategy, even now with the launch of their latest products.

Both companies followed a similar strategy in their lifecycle: they both started niche with very expensive products to fuel their innovation activities, while they put their bet on a strong brand name, on high-end design, even on an influential, eccentric CEO.Then they developed an ecosystem of important technologies (e.g. supercharge vs touchscreen) and solutions that supported their main offering (e.g. Tesla battery vs iPhone).They even faced similar financial crises, getting close to bankruptcy. On the other hand, Tesla did not the mistakes of Apple and was more open to partnerships and stakeholders early on, with open patents and SDK on their cars (almost), as they needed the community on their side to convince their customers to do a more risky and greater transition from gas to electric energy.

What Tesla did faster than Apple was the democratization of its technology.

In 2016, both companies have a huge step forward for their strategies; Tesla does with Model 3 only 13 years after its foundation what took Apple 40 years to do: They choose to make technology affordable to masses:

  • Tesla launched Model 3, a high-tech supercar that you can purchase with $35K, a bit more expensive than the boring hybrid Prius but still cooler and faster; Model 3 a car much more affordable and less equipped than existing Tesla models, but still a brilliant car.
  • Apple launched iPhone SE, a smaller phone with better battery than iPhone 6s, better specs than iPhone 5s, and a lower price of 400$; if someone wants to buy a high-quality smartphone, now he has to choose among an iPhone SE, a Nexus phone and maybe some other flagships phones (e.g. OneNote) which are equally or even more expensive.

In 2016, two high-end, luxurious technological products became more affordable to mainstream users. Tesla did it proactively to catch up competition and lead the electric-car market, even the presentation of Elon Musk was based on presenting their strategy. Apple did it reactively to respond to dropped iPhone sales for the first time after the launch of the product line, and even Jony Ive was missing from the frame.

The opportunity for Tesla to disrupt the car industry worths this transition.

The opportunity for Tesla to disrupt the car industry worths this transition, but is it equally important for Apple? Apple does control the (value not the size of the) smartphone market already which has been already disrupted by Apple , while it has multiple other product lines that are quite expensive (i.e. there was a reduction also in the Apple Watch). Why did Apple has chosen to do this lately?

Apple couldn’t stand missing the strategic role of iPhone in its ecosystem.

Apple is in a critical point of maturity. Many Apple fans complain lately about the lost hype of Apple. iPhone 6 didn’t impress many people but only followed the hype of larger screens; iPad has more name tags than Windows Vista; Same with MacBooks, which show no progress and still remain extremely expensive ($1,800 for a serious laptop is insanely expensive); Apple TV is still immature, Apple car makes no meaning lately, Apple Watch has one more chance to impress us. In the center of this ecosystem is the iPhone, everything connects and interacts with an iPhone, thus Apple couldn’t stand missing the strategic role of iPhone in its ecosystem, as well an entry point to its ecosystem of products and service.

If a more affordable iPhone is enough for Apple to keep growing – or if new product lines or more affordable versions of their existing products are required – will be realized by the end of 2016. For Tesla we have to wait a bit longer to see how its strategy goes in action…

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s